A few pictures

Some things I have been working on lately:

A nice row of transmitters
A nice row of transmitters

Finishing up a transmitter site rehab.  The BE FM20T is nearly 20 years old.  The BE FM2C transmitters are new.  There is also a rack of new fiber equipment and CODECs.  This site has good utilization; there are three stations on one tower with a shared STL antenna and generator.

Energy Onix ECO-6
Energy Onix ECO-6

Energy Onix ECO-6 tube type transmitter.  One of Bernie’s better designs, a grounded grid tube with solid state driver section.  This one needed some fans replaced and a new tube.

AM transmitter site.  Looks like these vines have not been cut in a couple of years.
AM transmitter site. Looks like these vines have not been cut in a couple of years.

I wonder how much the guy tensions have changed…

Noticed this after some particularly strong thunderstorms
Noticed this after some particularly strong thunderstorms

The reason why you do not use a POTS line phone during a thunderstorm.

USS Slater radio room
USS Slater radio room

I took a tour of the USS Slater, a museum ship in Albany, NY.  The museum has painstakingly restored the ship to its WWII configuration.  The main transmitter is the RCA TBL-8 seen in the left/center of this picture.  This unit put out 200 to 400 watts CW or 150 watts AM phone.  During the hostilities it was turned off as allied ships observed radio silence unless they were sinking (and sometimes even then).

A little ChiFi tube type RIAA phone preamp.
A little ChiFi tube type RIAA phone preamp.

I have been fooling around with this little 6AK5 preamp.  I find it works very well and sounds better than the built in phone preamp on my Kenwood VR-309.  The FU-29 tube amp did not come with a phone preamp.

This is a short video clip of an audio processor at one of our transmitter sites. The fancy lights around the control knob are designed for the program director. They are saying “Buy me… Buy me…”

Audio Bit Rates and Formats

Occasional reader and blogger Robert has broken down all the information on audio bit rates and audio formats.

His work can be found here: Ultimate Guide to Audio Bit Rates and Formats

It is a good read, especially for those that use audio streaming as their main content distribution method.

Streaming only stations used to be a big thing but have been supplanted by Spotify and Pandora.  I am not a huge fan of either of those services but I do like to listen to podcasts.

Good audio should be near the top of the list for any content provider.  Few things are more annoying than listening to an interesting podcast with low volume, background noise or other technical defects.

BE AM tuning network

Occasional reader Scott asked for a picture of the inside of a BE AM output tuning network.  I figured it might be helpful to make a short post about it.

These things are pretty simple; a T network with a capacitive leg to ground.

BE AM Output tuning network
BE AM Output tuning network

This particular unit is for 1230 KHz.  I believe the capacitor is frequency determined and they may also use larger inductors for lower frequencies.

BE AM output tuning network schematic
BE AM output tuning network schematic

The inductors are Kintronic LV-15-20 (15uH 20 amp) and the capacitor is 0.0018 uF CDE 6KV 5.6 amp.

The issue with this particular unit is dirt.  The inductors have round metal plates that roll along the inductor coil to make the variable inductor tap.  Dirt has accumulated on the coil turns and on the inside of the plates.  This, in turn, causes arcing anytime the Tune or Load controls are moved.  A through cleaning should take care of the problem.

More AM retuning work

Working on another old AM station, this one is a simple Class C one tower on 1230 KHz.

Broadcast Electronics AM Output Tuning Network
Broadcast Electronics AM Output Tuning Network

The main problem today was this BE AM output network unit between the BE AM1A and the ATU.  This site has had some dirt difficulties over the years and the internal parts of this tuning unit arc at full power.  I attempted to drive the ATU directly with the transmitter, which was a no-go.

Gates Radio 1 KW AM ATU, circa 1947
Gates Radio 1 KW AM ATU, circa 1947

I took a look at the ATU, which is a pretty standard Gates 1 KW ATU from the late forties or early fifties.  I have seen perhaps dozens of these things.

My first thought was that over the years, likely due to changes in the ground system, the base impedance has shifted away from it’s licensed values.  However, a quick measurement of the base impedance shows it to be exactly at the licensed value, 17.3 ohms.  The tower is 67 degrees tall, so that impedance value is right in the theoretical norm.

I  measured the input to the ATU, which showed 38 ohms with about 7 ohms capacitive reactance.  I can only surmise that it has always been this way.  The transmitter in use before the BE AM1A was a Harris/Gates Radio BC-1G.  That model transmitter will drive anything including an open transmission line.

Retuned ATU input; 49 ohms resistive, 0 ohms reactance
Retuned ATU input; 49 ohms resistive, 0 ohms reactance

Having the bridge on hand, I decided to retune the ATU for a better match. I put the bridge on the input terminals of the ATU and set it to 50 j0.  Using the remote control, I turned the transmitter off and on while making small adjustments to the output strap on the coil until the resistance was 49 ohms with zero reactance.  I would have gotten it to 50 ohms, but the strap on the output side of the coil would not stretch far enough to reach the proper spot on the coil.

Now the transmitter will run into the ATU directly at full power with about three watts reflected.   The BE AM output matching network unit has been removed for cleaning and repairs.  I will reinstall it once those repairs are completed.