WKNY, Kingston, NY

This is another one of those, ahem, AM success stories. WKNY is on 1490 KHz, 1,000 Watts day and night from a transmitter site that is located very close to it’s target audience of Kingston. It signed on on December 16, 1939 broadcasting 100 watts on 1500 KHZ according to the Broadcasting Yearbook 1940 edition.

WKNY transmitter site location
WKNY transmitter site location

The transmitter location is the key to this station’s good signal over Kingston. Even though it is a class C AM station, when driving around the Kingston city limits there is no electrical interference or night time co-channel interference.  The reason for this is because most of the city limits are within 2.5 to 3 miles (4 to 4.8 km) from the tower.

WKNY transmitter building and tower
WKNY transmitter building and tower

This is the original transmitter building and tower.  Like many old AM transmitter sites, this one is located in a low, swampy area.  The tower is electrically tall for 1490 KHz, at 92 meters (305 feet)  it is 163 electrical degrees. Something else that may contribute to the station’s performance.

WKNY tower base
WKNY tower base
WKNY tower
WKNY tower

WKNY tower, typical design of a uniform cross section guyed tower from the late 1930’s to late 1950’s.

WKNY transmitter
WKNY transmitter

WKNY transmitter. Another Nautel ND-1 series transmitter. Nothing every breaks or goes wrong.

Air studio, WKNY Kingston, NY
Air studio, WKNY Kingston, NY

The air studio has an AudioArts R-60 console. For an inexpensive audio console, these things sure seem to last for a long time. I think this one was put in in 1997.

Talk Studio, WKNY KIngston, NY
Talk Studio, WKNY KIngston, NY

A small talk studio is used to originate local programming of interest. This morning, I was listening to “Speak Out With Jody McTague,” a local interest program which was discussing the impacts being felt in the Kingston area due to the “Affordable Health Care Act.”

WKNY production studio
WKNY production studio

The production studio has a rather old Harris rotary pot console from the 1980’s.

Of course, all of this equipment makes radio transmission possible, but what makes radio itself is the local people working at the station and bringing relevant information to the area.  I know a lot of very smart people are working on the “solution” to the AM problem.  It really has to do with the programming.

Happiness is: An AM directional array at licensed values

Last week I did some repair work at WDDY in Albany NY. It seems the sample line on one of the towers was melted in half by a lightning strike. This station uses sample loops up on the tower for their directional antenna monitoring system.

WDDY antena array, Albany, NY
WDDY antena array, Albany, NY

As it happened, the sample line in question was on the reference tower, which makes everything else meaningless.  Before the meltdown, there were several years worth of maintenance logs which showed the previous values for current ratio and phase relationship.

With the transmitter turned off and locked out, I removed the damaged section of line from the base of the tower to the RF choke coil in the tuning house.  Where the sample line came off of the base of the tower, there was a UHF type connector which had been improperly applied.  Using spare parts, I fixed that connector, then spliced the line into place.  Upon power up, the transmitter and antenna readings returned to there previous values, which were slightly out of tolerance.

Thus, some phasor tuning was needed.  There are not too many people left that can properly tune an AM phasor.  All of the control interact with each other; moving the power or phase to one tower will likely effect all of the other towers and possibly the reflected power on the transmitter.  This phasor was made in the 1970’s by Multronics with what looks like all RCA parts.  Multronics, I think, was John Mullaney who is more known for the folded unipole antenna.  In anycase, after a good few hours of careful hand cranking and a run out to the reference tower to move a coil tap, here are the results:

WDDY tower one, reference
WDDY tower one, reference
WDDY tower two
WDDY tower two
WDDY tower three
WDDY tower three
WDDY forward/reflected power
WDDY forward/reflected power

Not bad for a day’s work.

Oh damn; La tercera parte

Now where did those vise (vice?) grips go?

Vice grip pliers used to clamp RF feed to tower
Vise grip pliers used to clamp RF feed to tower

Oh yeah, that’s right, they were used to attach the RF feed to an AM tower.  About ten years ago.

Vice grip tower clamp
Vise grip tower clamp

From this view, it looks like whatever tower crew installed this tower could not manage to solder or braze the copper RF connection to the steel tower.  The area was then painted, but it looks like there is some corrosion going on between metals.

Vice grips clamping RF feed to tower
Vise grips clamping RF feed to tower

Another view.

AM broadcast tower
AM broadcast tower

This is a relatively new tower.  Sadly, it is very likely that this station will be going off the air soon.  If the station is still on the air come springtime, I will drag the brazing outfit across the field/swamp and fix this.  If the station goes dark, then I won’t worry about it.

Oh, damn: la segunda parte

Emergency! The (AM) Transmitter keeps popping off the air and we can’t figure out why! YOU MUST HELP US!!1!!!

Really?

Some problems are easy to spot, difficult to fix
Some problems are easy to spot, difficult to fix

Well, with the ATU mounted about 1/4 inch away from the 90 degree, series excited tower, I wonder why.  It seemed to be especially problematic during rain, snow and ice storms.   When I asked how long this had been going on, I was told “About two years, ever since we put up the new tower!”

You don’t say.

We finally took care of this by moving the ATU back inside the shed after moving the transmitter to a different building.  The funny thing is, this was installed by a guy who had a BSEE.  I guess he must have been out sick the day they covered this in class.