The Raytheon RL10 Limiting Amplifier

Update: Apparently this is quite interesting to a number of people.  I have rescanned the manual, properly compressed it and which you may find it here.

Found this manual at one of the older transmitter sites:

Raytheon RL10 limiting amplifier manual cover
Raytheon RL10 limiting amplifier manual cover

Entire manual is available for your reading pleasure here: Raytheon RL10 limiting amplifier

As this is an older design than either the Gates Sta level or the Collins 26U, it may not be as useful to tube audio enthusiasts.

Raytheon RL-10 Schematic diagram
Raytheon RL-10 Schematic diagram

The main issue with the Gates and Collins unit is the GE 6386 remote cutoff triode used, which were great tubes, but very difficult to come by these days.  This design calls for a 1612 or 6L7, which is a pentagrid amplifier.  Feedback is provided by the screen of the following stage, a 6SJ7GT.  Anyway, perhaps it will give somebody some idea on how to make a good tube compressor limiter.

New Studio Project, Part II

The finished product:

SAS Rubicon console, WAJZ Albany, NY
SAS Rubicon console, WAJZ Albany, NY

This is the finished product from an earlier post.  Currently, it it the studio for WAJZ in Albany, but that is not permanent.  The SAS studio goes together fairly quickly, as most of the trunking between the TOC and studio is done over the SAS data channel.

The studio monitors (Tanoy Reveal) are set on little posts under the computer screens. I like this set up as the DJ’s are less likely to rock the house if they decide to crank up the volume on their favorite tune.  I am also kind of digging the lack of a table top equipment pod.  That takes up a lot of counter top space and always seems to be in the way.  There are two CD players rack mounted below the counter (lower left), which are almost never used.

New Studio project

It is time, once again, to replace some very old Pacific Recorders BMXII consoles. The Pacific Recorders consoles were very expensive when new, but after 30 years of continuous use, have more than paid for themselves.  The replacement console of choice for this installation is a SAS Rubicon.  I have installed these units elsewhere and they are the modern equivalent of the PRE BMX.

The heart of the Rubicon system is the 32KD router.  Routed audio systems can save a lot of time and effort in a large studio facility installation.  Not having to run and terminate multiple analog and digital trunk cables between rack room and studio is a huge deal in a six or ten studio installation project.

The SAS 32KD router and Rubicon console system uses a serial TDM buss to communicate and transport audio around.  This is a simpler system than packet switched IP data.  Basically, the console surface is a very large, fancy computer control interface.  Here are some pictures of the start of the project:

New Studio room, furniture installed
New Studio room, furniture installed

This is the view from the entry door. The furniture was placed last week and the counter top cut in for the console. The furniture is made by Studio Technology.  The pile of yet to be installed equipment:

New studio equipment to be installed
New studio equipment to be installed

For monitors, we are using the Tanoy 602p near field monitor placed on the table top above the computer screens.  This studio will not have a turret.  Turrets used to be necessary to hold things like cart machines and CD players.  These days the CD players are used so infrequently that it was decided to put them in the side rack under the counter top.  Turrets also take up a lot of counter top space that can be put to better use.

New studio punch blocks
New studio punch blocks

Punch blocks and power connections.  The red outlets are isolated ground UPS type, the back outlets are feed by the emergency generator power panel.  All electric wiring is inside of metal conduit.  The punch blocks are the inputs to the SAS RIO link unit, one 16 pair analog audio cable and ten category 5e shielded cables.  The cat 5e is used for computer and TDM data buss to the router.

New Studio Rubicon console
New Studio Rubicon console

The SAS Rubicon console cut into the counter top and protected by plastic sheets.

Rack room
Rack room

Rack room with 32KD routers.  This facility has 9 studios total plus a news room with three work areas.

SAS 32KD router on line
SAS 32KD router on line

The SAS 32KD router.  All audio from the automation systems, satellite feeds and other sources is connected directly to these units.  This unit is on line for other studios that have already been converted to the SAS gear.

Goodbye, ISDN

The imminent demise of ISDN has been talked about for some time.  There now appears to be a date attached which makes it semi-sort of official.  As of May 18, 2013, Verizon will no longer accept orders for new ISDN lines.  They will also not make any changes to existing lines and will start charging more for the service.

Taking the place of ISDN will be a variety of Ethernet/IP based audio transmission methods.  As technology evolves, this makes sense.  The quality of ISDN and the bidirectional nature was a vast improvement over the old system  5/7/10/15 KHz point to point analog lines.  The one downside, ISDN equipment was expensive and the service was expensive to install and operate.

High speed internet is available in almost every business and venue.  Many times, there is no cost to access it and equipment is relatively inexpensive.  Depending on the equipment, CODEC, and speed, it can sound almost as good as ISDN.  For those opposed to using the public network due to reliability issues, there is always frame relay.

Time moves on, so buy your IP CODECS now.