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The Horns of a Dilemma

Alternate title: Building and ATU in a truck body tool box.

Alternate title II: I should get paid extra for this shit.

There is an AM radio station that is near death but the owners do not want it to go away.  Nor to they want to spend very much money to keep it around, thus the dilemma.  At the transmitter site, there are a multitude of problems; leaking roof, very old rusty ATU, rotting support posts and transmission line bridge, equipment racks rusting out, nothing is grounded properly, the building is full of junk, snakes and mice have moved in.  To further complicate things, the tower and transmitter building serve as an STL relay point for two of the market’s FM stations.  There is also two translators with antennas on the tower.  The ATU and tower light choke box are rusting through, which is causing arcing and broadband RF noise that is interfering with the FM station’s STL receiver.  There was a home made isocoupler for one of the translators that was allowing AM RF back into the building which was creating havoc with everything.  Because of this, the AM station is currently silent.  In short, it is a mess.

WCHN ATU

WCHN ATU

The red box on the bottom is the ATU, the plywood box on the top with the peeling yellow paint is the home made isocoupler, the tower light choke box is behind the isocoupler.

Crumbling old ATU output capacitor in series with tower

Crumbling old ATU output capacitor in series with tower

This was the capacitor that was feeding the antenna, .0041uf, 10KV 8 amps.

We started remediation on this last February, which is not optimum time for replacing rotting wooden posts.  However, we were able to clean out the building.  The leaking roof has been repaired.  I was able to find a few old racks from a Schafer Automation system to replace the rusted out original racks.  I began the process of grounding the equipment racks, the incoming transmission lines for the STL, etc.

Cool morning, Garter Snakes warming themselves on top of a Moseley DSP-6000

Cool morning, Garter Snakes warming themselves on top of a Moseley DSP-6000

Garter Snake

Garter Snake

We will have to find out how they are getting in, the plug up those holes.

Then there was the ATU and tower light choke enclosures.  Original to the 1952 sign on, they were past their serviceable days.  Since this is all being done on a budget and nobody wants to spend money on an AM station that has little or no listeners and even less revenue, we had a problem.

Then somebody suggested building an ATU in a truck body tool box.  Well…  This isn’t the Meadowlands, so if there are no other alternatives then okay, I guess.  Off to Amazon to order a tool box.  This particular unit seems fine, my only comment is on the gauge aluminum (or aluminium if you prefer), which is slightly thin for holding up all those parts.

ATU built in a truck body tool box

Fabrication shop, ATU built in a truck body tool box

Still, the box itself is nice enough and certainly better than the old one.  I was able to reuse the inductor and the Delta current meter but the old Sangamo capacitors crumbled in my hands when I removed them.  I also saved the feed through bowls, J-plugs and other parts.  I used some copper strap to run a good RF ground from the input to the ground connection.  Overall, I am pretty pleased with the finished product.  It is a little bit tight in there, but this station only runs 1 KW, so it should be fine.

Replacement ATU mounted

Replacement ATU mounted

So, new pressure treated posts installed, the box was mounted and the transmission line connected.

Replacement ATU under power.

Replacement ATU under power.

Reused Schaffer Automation racks, much better than the 1950's Gates racks

Reused Schafer Automation racks, much better than the 1950’s Gates racks

The reused racks are old, but serviceable and a big improvement over the old, rusting out racks.  I was able to bond each rack to the ground strap that used to connect to the RCA BTA-1 transmitter.  There is one more rack to install to the right of these two.  That should give us more than enough rack space for this site.

The station is back on at full power and not interfering with the FM STLs or the translators.  You can actually touch the rack and not get an RF burn!

We are also working on an air conditioner.

Other work at this site; cleaning out the building, replacing the tower light photocell, installing a ground buss bar, some STL lightning protectors, dress the transmission lines, etc.  It is a work in progress.

 

Medium Frequency ATU design

This is a topic I have covered before, but it is worth doing it again for future reference.  The previous post covered downgrading an AM transmission facilities for WGHQ, Kingston, NY.

This is part II of that process.

WGHQ transmitter site, towers 1 and 2 removed

WGHQ transmitter site, towers 1 and 2 removed

The old towers have been cut up and put in a scrap metal dumpster. They are off to China to be melted down and made into a submarine or a missile or a tank or something useful like that.

Towers scrapped

Towers scrapped

The directional array had a three towers in a straight line with a common point impedance of 60 Ohms.  Dropping two towers greatly changed the electrical characteristics of the remaining tower, therefore the existing ATU needed a bit of reworking to match the 50 Ohm transmitter output.

First step, correct a few deficiencies left over from the old array.

Vise grip tower feed

Vise grip tower feed

This vise grip RF connection has to go. The problem is where the tower erectors attempted to solder the copper tubing.  That tower base plate is pretty big and I would wager they didn’t use enough heat to make the solder connection.  They were probably working in the winter time, thus the “temporary” fix.  This tower was put up in 1993, so that temporary fix lasted 23 years.

I removed the offending tool and soldered the connection to another part of the tower with silver solder.  The smaller cross bar made a good connection point.

RF feed correctly connected to the tower

RF feed correctly connected to the tower

After soldering, I cleaned up and sprayed some grey primer on it to prevent rust forming where I scraped the paint off.

Next, I made an impedance measurement:

WGHQ tower base impedance measurement

WGHQ 920 KHz tower base impedance measurement

That junk on the upper part of the graph is coming from WHVW on 950 KHz. The tower itself looks pretty good, 77.6 Ohms resistance with 130 Ohms inductive reactance.  Since this is not a part of a directional antenna system, the ATU design is pretty straight forward.  Given that WHVW on 950 KHz is located 10.41 miles away, a low pass filter design is optimum.  A basic low pass filter T network has inductive input and output legs with a capacitive shunt leg to ground.

T network diagram

T network diagram

Each leg is used to match the 50 Ohm transmission line impedance (R1) to the 77.6 Ohm tower impedance (R2) and cancel out the 130 Ohms of inductive reactance.  This is a vector impedance problem, much like a vector force problem in physics.   Some basic arithmetic is required (always include the units):

X1, X2, X3 = √(Zin x Zout)

X1, X2, X3 = √(50Ω x 77.6Ω) or X = 62.28Ω

The value of inductance or capacitance for each leg is calculated using the basic inductance or capacitance formulas:

L (μH) = XL / 2πf(MHz)

And

C (μF) = 1 / 2πf(MHz) XC

Thus the input leg, or X1 = 62.28Ω / (6.28 x 0.92 MHz) or 10.78 μH

The Shunt leg, or X2 = 1 / (6.28 x 0.92 MHz x 62.28Ω) or .0028 μF

The output leg is a little different.  The tower has 130 Ohms of inductive reactance that needs to be cancelled out with a capacitor.  Rather than cancel out all of the inductive reactance, then add an inductive output leg, the tower reactance can be used as part of the tuning circuit.  The design calls for 62.28 Ohms inductive reactance, so 130Ω – 62.28Ω = 67.27Ω, which is the value needed to be cancelled by a capacitor:

Output leg, or X3 = 1 / (6.28 x 0.92 MHz x 67.27Ω) or .0025 μF

A little Ohm’s law is used to calculate the base current for both the day and night time operations.

Ohm's law pie chart calculator

Ohm’s law pie chart calculator

Thus the daytime base current is I = √(P/R) or I = √(1000 W/77.6Ω) or 3.58 Amps.

Night time base current is I = √(38 W/77.6Ω) or 0.70 Amps

Current handling requirements:

Base current is calculated to be 3.6 Amps at 1,000 Watts carrier power.  Allowing for 125% peak positive modulation makes it 5.7 Amps.  Having safety factor of two or 11.4 Amps output leg and 14 Amps input leg.

Voltages: 353 maximum input voltage, 439 output.

Thus, 20 amp, 10 KV parts should work well.

The designed schematic for the ATU:

WGHQ ATU Schematic diagram

WGHQ ATU Schematic diagram

Putting it all together.

Since the tower looks fairly broad at 920 KHz, we are going to attempt a nice broadband ATU to match it.  This station is currently programmed with a classic country format, and I have to tell you; those old Conway Twitty, Merle Haggard, Patsy Cline, et al., songs sound pretty good on the old AM radio.  The Subaru stock radio has HD, which also has a nice broad IF section, thus allowing all those lovely mid-high range frequencies through.

This is the existing ATU, which I believe was built by Collins in 1960:

WGHQ Tower 3 ATU

Existing WGHQ T network ATU

The ATU building is a little rough, but the ATU itself is in remarkable shape for being 56 years old.  The input leg inductor is in the center and will be reused as is. The large Jennings vacuum capacitor at the bottom is a part of the shut leg.  Its value is 2000 pF at 15 KV.  The top vacuum capacitor is series output cap, its value is 1000 pF at 15 KV.  The basic plan is to move the upper cap down in parallel with the bottom cap.  The shut leg inductor will be kept in place to tune out any access capacity.  For the output leg, I have a 2500 pF mica cap and a 10-100 pF variable cap connected in parallel.  The inductor on the output leg will be removed.

After some re-work on the ATU components, I tuned everything up.  The easiest way to do this is to disconnect the legs, measure them individually and adjust them for the desired reactance, which in this case is 62.28 ohms or thereabouts.  The output leg was measured with the tower connected since the tower reactance is a part of the tuning circuit.  The input leg was right about 10 μH.  The shunt leg turned out to be about 0.002 μF.  This is often the case, theoretical values are slightly different than field values due to stray capacitance and inductance in the connecting straps, etc.

This is the load, as measured at the output terminals on the transmitter:

WGHQ tower load as measured at the transmitter output terminals

WGHQ tower load as measured at the transmitter output terminals

Slightly asymmetric on 910 KHz, but overall pretty good. There is a fair amount of phase rotation in the transmission line due to the length from transmitter to tower (855 feet, 260.6 meter), which works out to be 0.93 wave length allowing for the 86% velocity factor of the transmission line.

Time to pack up and go home.

Downgrading an AM radio station

WGHQ in Kingston, NY has been downgraded from a 5KW DA-1 to a 1KW non-DA system.  This was done because two of the three towers in the directional antenna array dated from 1960, were in very rough condition and needed to be replaced.  The remaining tower (furthest from the transmitter building) had been replaced in 1994, is in good condition and is being kept as the non-directional radiator.

Here are a few pictures:

WGHQ 3 tower directional antenna array, Port Ewen, NY

WGHQ 3 tower directional antenna array, Port Ewen, NY

More deferred maintenance

More deferred maintenance

RF and tower light feed disconnected from tower base

RF and tower light feed disconnected from tower base

Second tower base vegetation not as bad, tower disconnected

Second tower base vegetation not as bad, tower disconnected

WGHQ transmitter and original Collins phasing cabinet

WGHQ transmitter and original Collins phasing cabinet

First tower video (sorry, I appear to have no idea what I am doing with the camera):

Second tower video, this one is better:

Towers on the ground:

I made measurements on the third tower and constructed a temporary ATU with parts on hand to get the station back on the air. They are now running 1 KW day, 38 watts night, as per their CP. I will be going back up to finish the job once the brush has been removed from around the existing tower and the ATU building has been repaired.  The coverage with 1 KW is not bad, actually:

Predicted coverage map from FCC website

Predicted coverage map from FCC website

The translator is on its way.

The Ubiquiti Nano-Beam

I installed one of these wireless links between two transmitter buildings recently.  The Ubiquiti gear is not my first choice, however, the client insisted that we use this equipment likely because of its inexpensive nature (less than $65.00 per unit).  My overall impression is so-so.  They are fairly easy to set up; the AirOS is intuitive and easy to navigate around.  I had to upgrade the firmware, change the default user name and pass word, assign IP addresses, subnet mask, gateway information, SSIDs, security parameters, etc.  All of that was very easy to figure out.  My grip is this; it seems the hardware is a bit plastic-y (e.g. cheep).  I know some of the Ubiquiti models are better than others.  I hear good things about the airFiber units but they still don’t compare to the Cambium/Canopy gear.

For this installation, I used the shielded Ubiquiti “Tough Cable” with the shielded Ubiquiti RJ-45 connectors and Ubiquiti Ethernet Surge Protectors.  When making the Ethernet cables up, I made sure the shield drain wire was connected to the metal body on the RJ-45 connector.  I tested everything with my trusty Fluke Microscanner cable verifier which also shows continuity for the shield.  I am still not completely confident that the out door units will survive a lightning strike on the 898 foot (273.7 meter) guyed tower nearby.  Time will tell.

The system has a wireless path length of about 200 meters plus another 60 meters or so of Ethernet cable.  Latency when pinging the gateway across the entire network is about 3 to 4 ms (laptop>switch>nanobeam<->nanobeam>switch>gateway).  The network is being used for remote control/monitoring of a transmitters and backup audio via Comrex Bric link II IP CODECs.

screen shot; Nano Beam Air OS

screen shot; Nano Beam Air OS v7.2.2

On the plus side, the 802.11ac link is very fast; 650+ Mbps unwashed link speed is pretty impressive.  Strip off the wireless LAN headers and that likely translates to greater than 500 Mbps goodput.  Also, the inexpensive nature of these units means that we can keep a few spares on hand in case something does suffer catastrophic damage due to a storm.  The AirOS v.7 is pretty cool with the RF constellation and other useful tools like airView (spectrum analyser with water fall display), discover, ping, site survey, speed test, trace route and cable test.

After installing the updated firmware, which fixes a major security flaw with the web interface, the link was established with three mouse clicks.  After that, I ran speed tests back and forth for several minutes.  Basically, the speed on the LAN is reduced because of the 100 Mbps switch.  Even so, that should be more than enough to handle the traffic on this segment of the network.

The 16 channel bi-directional STL

As a part of our studio build out in Walton, we had to install a high capacity STL system between the studio and transmitter site. Basically, there are five radio stations associated with this studio and the satellite dish and receivers are going to be located at the transmitter site.

The audio over IP gear is getting really sophisticated and better yet, more reliable.  For this application, we are using a Cambium networks (Motorola Canopy) PTP-250 radio set and a pair of Wheatstone IP88 blades on either site.  Since there is quite a bit of networked gear at the transmitter site, the IP88’s will live on their own VLAN.  The PTP-250’s will pass spanning tree protocol, rapid spanning tree protocol, 802.1Q and other layer two traffic.

The Wheatsone IP88A blades are the heart of the system.  Not only do they pass 16 channels of audio, we can also pass 8 logic closures bi-directionally.  This is key because we are shipping satellite audio and contact closures back from the transmitter site.  The IP88A set up is fairly easy, once the IP address is entered.  The web GUI is used for the rest of the configurations including making the connections between units.

Pair of Wheatstone IP88A AoIP interfaces

Pair of Wheatstone IP88A AoIP interfaces

The switches are managed units.  The switchports need to be set up via command line to pass VLAN traffic.  There is an appendix in the IP88 manual that outlines how to do this with various manages switches.  This is the most important step for drop out free audio.  The switchports that connect to the two radios are set up as trunk ports using either VTP or 802.1Q.

Cambium PTP-250 5.8 GHz out door units

Cambium PTP-250 5.8 GHz out door units

The PTP-250 radios were already on hand, new in box.  They are built really well and look like they should not break in a year or so.  These particular units are connectorized, therefore an external antenna was needed.  There are many such antennas, this system ended up with a RF Engineering & Energy 5150-5850 MHz dual polarized parabolic dish with RADOMES.  RADOMES are necessary to prevent ice or snow build up in the winter.

RF Engineering & Energy 5150-5850 MHz dual polarized parabolic dish with LMR400 jumpers

RF Engineering & Energy 5150-5850 MHz dual polarized parabolic dish with LMR400 jumpers

STL link dish installed

STL link dish installed

1 1/2 inch EMT going from TOC to roof

1 1/2 inch EMT going from TOC to roof

Since the path is only 3.37 miles (5.43 kilometers), I set them up with a 40 MHz wide channel.  This is a rural, small town setting.  When I looked at the 5.8 GHz band on a spectrum analyser, it looks fairly uncongested.  These are MIMO single or dual payload selectable.  I will try them as single payload units, since the path is short and the band uncongested.  This should keep the throughput high.

Studio to transmitter site LAN extension

Studio to transmitter site LAN extension

The PTP-250’s use POE injectors in mounted in the rack rooms.  CAT5e shielded cable with the proper connectors properly applied is a must for lighting protection.  The PTP-250 units came with Cambium PTP-LPU lightning protectors.  I also installed Polyphaser AL-L8XM-MA type N surge suppressors on each RF port of each PTP-250.

Studio Buildout, Part II

Some pictures of the studio build out in progress.

Counter top mounted

Counter top mounted

This is the counter top, mounted on a riser with the wire way cut into it. These counter tops will have AudioArts Air4 consoles installed on them.

AudioArts Air4 console with microphones

AudioArts Air4 console with microphones

Studio is taking shape. Console mounted with microphones. The rack mounted equipment goes in the Middle Atlantic rack under the counter top to the left of the console.  That rack is on casters so it rolls out to get access to the back of the equipment.  We have pretty much done away with cart pods or other counter top equipment housings.  The automation and other computers will be mounted in the rack room and extended to the studio with IP KVM extenders.

Sub Panel with manual transfer switch

Sub Panel with manual transfer switch

We installed a small Square D sub panel and manual transfer switch. This is to prevent the “Space Heater” outages, you know, when the morning show guy plugs a space heater into the same circuit as the console or computer, trips the breaker, then calls you because they are off the air. Yeah, good times.

In addition, the manual transfer switch will allow them to use a good portable generator if there is a prolonged power outage. On the bottom of the switch I installed a 30 amp twist lock input receptacle.

Since the building is older, the grounding buss was installed and wired directly to the ground at the service entrance panel.   The building sub panel for this floor is using conduit for the ground conductor back to the service entrance panel, which used to be code compliant but no longer.

5.8 GHz dish with non-penetrating roof mount

5.8 GHz dish with non-penetrating roof mount

STL/LAN extension dish installed on roof top. I used an old non-penetrating roof mount for a four foot satellite dish.  The building owner was very specific about not having anything puncture the new rubber membrane roof.  Thus, the heavy rubber mats and sand bags instead of cinder blocks.  These stations will be using a Cambium PTP-250 system for STL/TSL and LAN extension. This will haul program audio for five radio stations plus satellite backhaul and remote control. It is a relatively short path with the FM tower visible from the roof top.

5.8 GHz path to FM tower

5.8 GHz path to FM tower

It was kind of hazy when I took this picture, but if you look really close, you can see the FM tower out there on the hill top.  The path is 3.37 miles (5.43 KM).  With a 40 MHz channel width, that should net about 175 Mbps bi-directionally, which is more than enough to do what we want.  This set up will require a pair of managed switches and some VLAN configuration, which I will post separately.

Studio Buildout, Part I

We are in the process of building a couple of new studios for one of our clients. This one involves a small market combo of one AM and four FM stations.  These stations were formerly located at one of the transmitter sites, two miles outside of town on top of a large hill.  That site could be difficult to get to during the winter and the building itself was not in the best of shape.  Thus, plans were made to move the studios to a better location.  Fortunately, we discovered that right in the village there are several suitable office buildings.

Any worthwhile project needs to be planned for.  The first consideration is the Studio to Transmitter Link (STL) paths.  Since this is a radio studio, it makes sense to located it where viable RF STL paths exist.  One might be surprised by the number times the issue of bad or non-existent RF STL paths has come up during these types of projects.

Studio to transmitter site LAN extension

Studio to transmitter site LAN extension

The next thing to check is the satellite path.  The plan right now is to keep the satellite dishes at the transmitter site, however, at some point in the future we can relocated the satellite dish to the roof of the studio building if desired.

AMC-8 satellite path

AMC-9 satellite path

The floor space was measured out and I drew out a floor plan:

Walton Studio floor plan

Walton Studio floor plan

Before we started work, all of the walls were painted and new carpeting installed.

Almost nothing at the old studio is worth keeping. Thus, all of the furniture, consoles, racks, STLs, and other equipment needed to be ordered.  A local kitchen company traded out the counter tops, which we picked up at their facility and delivered to the studio ourselves.

Studio counter top

Studio counter top

We will build risers for these on site then mount the consoles and such.

New Studio Equipment

New Studio Equipment

In the mean time, most of the new studio equipment has been ordered and delivered. There are still some outstanding items that have not arrived, but I am assured that those are in process and should be showing up shortly.

Used equipment racks

Used equipment racks

These equipment racks came from another market, but are in good shape.

I had a good meeting with the building owner regarding roof access, a sub panel for the racks and studios and other issues.

Emergency Communications

In this modern day and age, we take electronic communication for granted. Imagine being plunged into a world were there are no phones, cellphones, internet, email, television or even radio. Back in the day when I served aboard ships, we called that being underway.

Way, way back in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, those that served at sea were at the mercy of the Fleet Post Office.  I will say, the FPO did a very good job routing the mail to the appropriate place, however, sometimes weeks or even a month would go by without mail.  When the mail finally did arrive, it all smelled the same.  Everyone’s wife or girl friend put some sort of scent on the outgoing, but since those letters mingled tightly packed in the same bag for weeks, often in hot humid tropical Pacific air, those scents blended together and became the Westpac Mail Smell, which permeated everything, even the letters from my father.

What will happen if people can’t sign on Facebook?

Fortune favors the prepared.

Communications loss in ordinary circumstances

Loss of utility company power, phone service and internet service can happen at any time for a variety of reasons.  The worst case scenario will occur when such loss is coupled with a natural disaster, which are often a major disruption of normal life.  Loss of information, especially at critical moments, can make a bad situation much worse.  In a situation where all normal means of communication are not functioning, something will fill that void, most likely the rumor mill.  That could be bad.

For information gathering, there are many options.  A good AM/FM shortwave radio is a decent start.  I would recommend a quality shortwave radio that has AM/USB/LSB options.  During run of the mill storms and power outages, many radio stations will remain on the air with emergency generators.  The key is to figure out which stations are staffed and offer good timely information.  NOAA all hazards radio can be good source of weather information, however, their transmitters can remain off the air for weeks or months at times.

One might ask “Isn’t this overkill or alarmist?”  I suppose that depends.  In the December 2007 ice storm, we had no power for seven days. In the aftermath of several major Northeast hurricanes and winter storms, some people had no power for more than two weeks.  Not only no power, but no cable, phone or internet either.  In situations like that, having some form of connection to the outside world can make a big difference.

Communications loss in less than ordinary situations

Other situations and scenarios may require more effort.  Prolonged information shortages could be triggered any number of national or global situations.  Shortwave receivers are not only for listening to international broadcast stations but also for tuning into the amateur radio (AKA “Ham”) frequencies as well.  Amateur radio is often used for emergency communications on a local and national and international level by governments and the Red Cross when other systems are out.  National and international communications are often heard on the HF band; 3-30 MHz.  The Amateur radio primary emergency voice nets are:

  • 3791.0 USB VOICE PRIMARY International, DX, and Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 5371.5 USB EMERGENCY Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 5403.5 USB EMERGENCY Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 7185.5 USB VOICE PRIMARY International/Regional and Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 14346.0 USB VOICE PRIMARY International/Regional and Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 18117.5 USB VOICE PRIMARY International/Regional and Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 21432.5 USB VOICE PRIMARY International/Regional and Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 24932.0 USB VOICE PRIMARY International/Regional and Emergency/Disaster Relief
  • 28312.5 USB VOICE PRIMARY International/Regional and Emergency/Disaster Relief

These are voice channels from the ALE website. If there is not traffic on these frequencies, tune around a little bit.  In addition to voice nets, the amateurs also use something called ALE, which stands for automatic link establishment.  This is a data system that can be decoded on a listen only basis with a computer and some free software, for those so inclined.

For local amateur communications, 2 meter and 70 cm repeaters are often pressed into service.  For those, a VHF/UHF scanner is required.  Get a trunking scanner for 800 MHz police/fire dispatch as well.  Make sure that all radios can operate on 12 volts DC.  For this application, the size of the solar panel and battery is moderate, as receivers do not use much current.

Another option is a wide band USB radio for a lap top computer like a WinRadio WR-G315e.  These devices can be power by the USB outlet on the computer while the computer itself is charged with a solar panel.  For this route, some research on lap top solar chargers is needed.  The DC power requirements vary from lap top to lap top, so I can only offer general advice here.

With any receiver, a good antenna will greatly improve performance.  If there is room for an outdoor antenna, any length of wire strung up in a tree, away from power lines will work well.  For indoor setups, some type of receiving loop will work best.

Prolonged loss of communications in extraordinary circumstances

For longer term situations, gaining access to vital information and communications may become more problematic.  First of all, electronic communications require electricity.  Long term disruptions to the electrical distribution system could occur by either natural or man made events.  When those events happen, those that are prepared will be in a better position to survive if not thrive.  Things like ad hoc computer networks and amateur radio can facilitate two way communications.  In order to use amateur radio, one needs to get a license first.  This is a pretty easy thing to do and most other amateur radio operators won’t talk to you without a valid call sign.  Not only will they not talk to you, they will likely track you down and report you to the FCC.  That is the nature of the hobby, like it or don’t.

Amateur radio set ups can be very simple and not terribly expensive.  An used HF radio can be purchased on eBay for a moderate sum.  A simple multiband vertical antenna will serve general purposes.  For those that are interested in HF Link, a newer radio will work better.

Wireless ad hoc computer networks can be set up to establish a quasi internet over a moderate sized area.  WiFi WAN networks can be locally established using 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 5.8 GHz and 24 GHz license free channels.  Depending on the frequency, those links can be used for point to point medium to long haul links, or to establish local links to laptops and wireless devices:

  • 900 MHz: lower speed data rates, long haul, good to moderate building and vegetation penetration
  • 2.4 GHz: Limited channel availability, high atmospheric absorption, moderate speeds, low vegetation and building penetration
  • 5.8 GHz: High number of channels available, potential interference issue with TDWR radar systems, moderate to high speeds, line of sight only
  • 24 GHz: Large bandwidth, high speed, point to point back haul, line of sight only

Once the information is obtained, distribution to the greater public becomes a problem.  A very simple webserver (Apache, Nginx) with a light weight, simple index page containing vital information, news, weather, etc can be set up on a laptop and all HTTP traffic directed to the default index page.  This type of set up could be run off of a battery charged by a solar panel.  The issue here would be obtaining the information to put on the web page.

North Adams tower update III

And final.

It has been a year and a half since the tower collapse in North Adams, Massachusetts.  Since that time, WUPE-FM (Gamma Broadcasting), WNNI and W266AW (New England Public Radio) have been operating with STAs at lower than licensed power.   We have completed the installation of the combined antenna, filters and combiners and now all stations are back to full power.  Here are a few pictures of the transmitter room:

WUPE-FM and WNNI transmitter racks, North Adams, MA

WUPE-FM and WNNI transmitter racks, North Adams, MA

WUPE-FM (left hand rack) is using a Crown FM-2000 transmitter, loafing along at 1,060 watts. WNNI (right hand rack) is using a Gates Air Flexiva 2 running at 1,650 watts. Those stations are combined with a Shively Combiner:

Shively combiner

Shively 2 way star junction combiner

We are still doing some grounding and neatening work behind the racks:

Behind racks

Behind racks

The Shively versa tune antennas that were mounted to the wooden utility pole as emergency antennas will be retained as backup antennas for both stations.

Transmitters for WUPE, WNNI and W266AW

Transmitters for WUPE, WNNI and W266AW

We share the room with Access Plus, which is a wireless internet service provider in western Massachusetts. There stuff is in the open frame racks to the right of WNNI.

Another view:

Transmitter racks for WUPE-FM, WNNI and W266AW

Transmitter racks for WUPE-FM, WNNI and W266AW

TL;DR: Tower collaspes, facility is rebuilt better than before.

The Gates Air FAX-10

This is the first one of these transmitters that I have installed. This particular unit is analog only, but there is lots of room left over for an HD exciter, if need be.

GatesAir Flexiva FAX-10, 10.000 watt FM transmitter

GatesAir Flexiva FAX-10, 10.000 watt FM transmitter

The size of a 10 KW FM transmitter these days is pretty small, basically taking up the equivalent of one rack. This is a relatively small transmitter room, the old tube transmitter basically took up the entire room. With this unit, there is room to install a full power spare, if that was desired.

GatesAir Flexiva series RF modules.

GatesAir Flexiva series RF modules.

RF modules use LDMOSFET devices, each module has a power output of approximately 1,600 watts.

GatesAir Flexiva FAX10 power amp section

GatesAir Flexiva FAX10 power amp section

There are eight power amp modules and seven switching power supplies.

GatesAir FAX10 transmitter on the air

GatesAir FAX10 transmitter on the air

GatesAir FAX10 power output

GatesAir FAX10, licensed transmitter power output

One issue at this site, there is no reliable three phase power available.  There was a three phase open delta, but man, that thing scares me a little bit.  Since this is a single phase setup, I was curious to know what the current draw on each leg was at full power. I measured with my clamp on ammeter; 54.3 Amps at 120 volts, or 6516 watts per leg. Overall power draw 13,032 making the AC to RF efficiency 65.2%. VSWR calculates out to 1.21, which is not great.  I think the antenna could use a little bit of tuning love.

Axiom


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...radio was discovered, and not invented, and that these frequencies and principles were always in existence long before man was aware of them. Therefore, no one owns them. They are there as free as sunlight, which is a higher frequency form of the same energy.
~Alan Weiner

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