HF broadcasting station maintenance

This video shows some of the maintenance required for a HF (AKA Shortwave) broadcast station. It starts with transmission line tensioning, some shots of a curtain array then goes on to show the inside of a transmitter building. Transmitters shown are Harris HF-100 (a 1980’s model tube type PDM design) and Continental 418, but I didn’t see the letter number. They are likely tube modulated units.

These are from the international service of Australia Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), or Radio Australia International.

Keys, combos and contractors

The contracting company I work for takes care of 40-50 radio stations at any given time spanning from NYC and southern Connecticut up to the Canadian boarder.  Stations or groups sign contracts and some go by the wayside on a fairly regular basis.  All of this makes for the “Giant Box of Keys,” to be carried around in the work truck or whatever vehicle one is driving while on call.

Giant box of keys
Giant Box of Keys

The problem with the Giant Box of Keys is it never seems to be up to date.  New stations or groups join and didn’t get added.  Other stations fire employees and feel compelled to change the locks after doing so.  Therefore, I have found the Giant Box of Keys to be a hit or miss proposition.  In my former life as Director of Engineering for Pamal Broadcasting and Dame Media before that, I sought to simplify things as much as possible.

Master self set combination lock
Master self set combination lock

I found that replacing all keyed pad locks with self set combo locks made life much easier.  All of the tower fences, transmitter site fences and road gates now had the same combination and could be changed to another combination easily if needed.  That eliminated digging trough drawers looking for tower fences keys and or long walks back to the transmitter building because I forgot the key or the key didn’t work. Taking that a step further, I began to replace the door locks with these:

Simplex 1041 combination door lock
Simplex 1041 combination door lock

Unfortunately, those door locks are a good deal more expensive than the pad locks, somewhere between $300-400 per copy.  I only got a few done before the end came.  An alternative to this is a key lock box:

Master key lock box
Master key lock box

Of course, these are not fool proof either.  Occasionally, some previous user will forget to put the key back in the box.  I have also had one such box frozen under a lump of ice and once somebody swiped the whole box off of the wall with the aid of a sledge hammer or something.

There are some places where this approach will not work, such as high security sites or leased sites where the land lord dictates the lock policy.

Still, whenever possible, using combo locks saves time and money in the long run.  Rather than using precious engineering hours to make and distribute copies of keys, we can be more focused on doing real engineering work.

Hot Elbow

Found this 3 inch rigid elbow to be a little warm when we were removing a dividing wall as a part of an AC upgrade:

MYAT 3 inch elbow
MYAT 3 inch elbow

As measured with my Fluke 62 mini IR thermometer, the temperature is 163°F (72.7°C) at the clamp and drops down in both directions.

This is at WEBE and this particular section of transmission line is running 34 KW into the analog/digital combiner in the next room.  The clamps are tight, but you can see a little scorch mark on the stainless steel clamp right over the slot in the field flange.  That is where there is a gap between the outer conductors, which possibly means the inner conductor was cut slightly too long during installation.  I suspect this and or a problem with the bullet is causing the heating issue.  I was never (and still am not) a fan of those field flange type elbows, I’d much prefer the flanged type with a field flange on the straight line section.

34 KW is getting into the semi-serious power level for FM broadcasting.  At those levels, even small impedance mismatches can lead to big problems.  We have a new elbow, field flanges, bullets on order.  Unfortunately, we will have to take the station off the air to replace this.

WEBE transmitter site with partition removed
WEBE transmitter site with partition removed

This is all a part of an air conditioning project. There was a plywood partition wall between the front and the back of the transmitters which was impeding air flow.  All of the HVAC contractors who bid on the AC job identified it as an problem which needed to be addressed before the big 5 ton wall mount AC units were installed.

Update: Replaced elbow last night (8/4).  Went off at 10pm and back on at 10:25.  Found the inner conductor had been pushed out of place and was off center on the outside (toward the wall side) of the elbow.  This was an older elbow that did not have the nylon inner spacers on the center conductor.  The inner conductor was dark purple.  Before replacement, the elbow was 138°F (59°C) under full power (34 KW).  After replacement, it was 97°F (36°C) as was the rest of the transmission line.  At these power levels and frequencies, even small, minor imperfections cause impedance shifts and become issues.

Myat 3 1/8 inch elbow
Myat 3 1/8 inch elbow

I cleaned up and reused the bullets and the outer conductor with scotch brite. I also used more support wires because I believe the elbow was starting to pull apart, which can sort of be seen in the first picture.