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Why SBE certifications should matter, but often don’t

Industry certifications are good tools to gauge an person’s knowledge and experience. Often times, potential employers look for specific industry certs like CCNA, CCNP, Comp TIA A+ or MCSE as conditions of hire.  In highly technical fields, these are reasonable benchmarks.

what-does

In the field of Broadcast Engineering, a CCNA or a MCSE are nice, but do not cover the RF, audio or video skill sets.  True that more and more content transmission is migrating to IP networks, the initial input is still analog.  I have seen the most savvy IT guys utterly baffled by professional audio and/or video requirements.  A tube transmitter?  That is a special animal that can exact a high price from careless maintenance personnel, up to and including death.  That type of situation is clearly not covered by a CCNA or a MCSE.

The typical Broadcast Engineer straddles both worlds; IT and RF.  On any given day, s/he may be working on the computer automation system, or at the transmitter site fixing a transmitter.  Thus, we are jacks of all trades, master of none.  The finer points of configuring MS Active Directory may be beyond a Broadcast Engineer’s understanding.  Same with the tuning up an AM directional antenna.  At a typical broadcast facility, these projects do not happen very often and experts can be hired to complete this work as needed.  Having a specific industry certification for Broadcast Engineers makes a great deal of sense.

The reason SBE certifications often do not matter is that most station managers and owners have no idea what a Broadcast Engineer actually does.  It is an unfortunate situation when a non-technical manager has no idea where their subordinate is or what they are doing.  It is not simply a matter of accounting for time either.  Almost every station or cluster manager that I have ever known came from a sales background.  To many of them, engineering is a black art.  Working in such environments is a study in frustration especially when engineering is seen as a liability on the balance sheet; somewhere far below sales and promotions but slightly above the cost of garbage collection.  When these types of managers are in a hiring process and a candidate presents them with a set of letters following their name, who knows what they actually mean?  What hiring managers do know is this; more experience means more salary.

In order for SBE certifications to mean anything, the SBE itself needs to do a better job promoting its certification program to owners and non-technical managers.  This can be done through working with the NAB and other trade associations that broadcasters belong to.  Part of the reason why so few new people are coming into the Broadcast Engineering field is because career paths are ill-defined, promotion and advancement opportunities are limited, salaries are stagnant, and better opportunities are found in other technical fields.  A better understanding of Broadcast Engineering skill set would be helpful to non-technical managers, sort of a “Explain it like I am five,” (ELI5) type seminar.

SBE Certification

SBE-banner

I am toying around with the idea of reinstating my SBE certifications. At one time, I was certified as a Senior Radio Engineer.  That certification lapsed several years ago for a variety of reasons.  The first and foremost was my desire to find another career outside of radio.  At the time, I was working for a giant flaming asshole who prided himself in causing his subordinates health problems; things like strokes and heart attacks.  The sign over his desk read “The floggings will continue until morale improves.” I was also busy at home with a new, very young child and an old, broken down house.  There was not enough time to come up with enough professional points to re-certify or study for a test.  So, it went by the wayside.

Lately, however, I am beginning to see some advantage in having an SBE certification:

  • It comes in handy as a skills benchmark for potential clients and others
  • It lends some amount of credibility among fellow broadcast engineers
  • There is a support network for job searches

Thus, when I went to the SBE website and found the Jubilee Project, I was intrigued.  The SBE is offering to reinstate those former members with lapsed certifications until April of 2014 provided the applicant can supply enough recertification points.  I am also contemplating taking the Certified Broadcast Networking Engineer test for much the same reasons listed above.  I will let you know how it goes.

Incidentally, my ability to deal with giant flaming assholes as increased in the intervening years.  What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

The Society of Broadcast Engineers

The Society of Broadcast Engineers or SBE is an organization that is supposed to further the art of broadcast engineering.  Once upon a time I was a member, I attended meetings, got my Certified Senior Radio Engineer badge, I kept track of my professional development, and so on.  As the decay advanced, I realized that the SBE looks and sounds good, but actually does little.

What are the issues facing Broadcast Engineers these days:

  1. Too much work.  As consolidation changed the radio business, the engineering department was not immune to staff cuts.  Add to this the increasing dependence on automation and computers to program and run entire radio stations from studio to transmitter as additional responsibilities.
  2. Lack of maintenance budgets.  Particularly in this recession, money that should be spent on preventative maintenance is gone.  The result, more reactive maintenance, off air incidents and the like.
  3. Lack of pay for increased hours.  Goes with the above, more stations, more responsibilities, same or less pay and benefits.
  4. Lack of new talent in the radio engineering field.  There is money to be made if  you are a technical person, just don’t go into broadcasting.
  5. Lack of personal life.  Being on call 24/7 for 20 years has taken it’s toll.

So what has the SBE done to alleviate these problems?  Granted, most of them are management issues with the radio station staff, but has the SBE even tried to educate station owners and management.  How about helping engineers learn how to negotiate pay raises?  A better support network?  Perhaps, (gasp!) some type of organized labor?

I know the more work for same or less pay is almost universal and is a contentious issue among fellow engineers, so much so that many have left to pursue other careers.

Then again, perhaps the radio engineer is a dying breed.  Eventually, everything in a broadcast studio will be run by computers and distributed over the internet, so some type of computer guy could do the job.  Broadcast engineers will have to re-invent themselves to stay in the field because I think terrestrial radio’s days are numbered.  Eventually RF guys like myself could go work for the cellphone company, or go do something else.

Axiom


A pessimist sees the glass as half empty. An optimist sees the glass as half full. The engineer sees the glass as twice the size it needs to be.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
~1st amendment to the United States Constitution

Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.
~Benjamin Franklin

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. To be your own man is hard business. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.
~Rudyard Kipling

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes the freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers
~Universal Declaration Of Human Rights, Article 19

...radio was discovered, and not invented, and that these frequencies and principles were always in existence long before man was aware of them. Therefore, no one owns them. They are there as free as sunlight, which is a higher frequency form of the same energy.
~Alan Weiner

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