Great News! WE just doubled your work load!

This was and still is a very common theme.  Either by purchasing more radio stations and combining them, firing all of the overnight DJ’s and automating, or “combining market forces to create a better synergy,” the radio engineer gets more work dumped on him.  Naturally, they also have given out a hefty raise to boot, right?

No?

Has this happened to you? Why is it that the engineers always get shit upon?  I’ll tell you, look in the mirror.  Engineers (and IT guys) do it to themselves because they accept it.  Here is a news flash:

Radio stations cannot run without engineers

Think about it. Is the market manager going to be on call in case the Audiovault crashes?  Will he answer the phone when the automated station’s silence sensor goes off at 2 am?  Will he be able to fix it?  How about the transmitter or the internet web stream, or the e-mail, the broadband internet, the phone system, STL, the traffic computer, etc.

The more technology driven a radio station becomes, the more technology people will be needed.  It is also a little peculiar, at least to me anyway, that there are fewer and fewer radio engineers.

It is about time that radio station owners in particular come to realize a basic tenant of supply and demand.  As a commodity (our collective skill and knowledge about broadcasting) becomes rarer, the price goes up.  After all, the radio owner’s certainly are making money, Lew Dicky got his bonus this year in spite of the collapse of Cumulus stock prices.  I am sure that Lowery Mays is doing quite well in spite of the rumors of the looming Clear Channel bankruptcy.

What I am talking about is not stabbing your fellow engineer in the back.  If the above scenario plays out for you, don’t accept the additional work without a raise.  If you do, you diminish your value and the value of every other broadcast engineer.  When it comes to corporate management, these people are not human.  They are very well trained bean counters who know the cost of everything but the value of nothing.