For the Love of Radio

One of the guys I work with is a little bit crazy. Well… actually more than one, but this one person in particular has gone out of his way to fix up a summer camp radio station.  So, the background is this; in a remote region, far, far away from thing else, a summer camp had installed a license free (allegedly FCC Part 15) radio station to cover the camp compound.   Many summers later, said camp management had some questions and concerns about the operation.  This is where our protagonist comes into the story.

Not only did the camp owners have questions about their operation, they also had coverage issues.  Their installation consisted of a Ramsey five watt all in one FM transmitter feeding a horizontally polarized television antenna on the roof of the studio fed with RG-6 coax.  There were several coverage holes within the immediate camp complex and they were asking of a more powerful transmitter was needed.  In light of this, our man Pete did some engineering outreach.  Over the period of several months, Pete scraped together what would have been mostly back shelf backup gear, perhaps a few things destined for the dumpster and other miscellaneous items and built a small radio station for them.

Camp Radio Station equipment rack
Camp Radio Station equipment rack

What was once, no doubt, an illegal operation was brought substantially into compliance by replacing the Ramsey broadcast transmitter with a QEI 675 exciter modified by removing the power amp and connecting the IPA to the output filter.  Thus modified, it runs a maximum of 0.2 watts, which is not necessarily the output power. The antenna was changed to a home made vertically mounted dipole antenna.  The addition of a broadcast quality limiter ensures that the station is not over modulating.  A recently calibrated Belar FM modulation monitor confirms this.  Some Texar Audio Prisms juice up the sound a little bit.  A Urei console, a couple of Shure SM-58 microphones and a computer round out the operation.

Camp Radio Station console and computer
Camp Radio Station console and computer

Now, the camp radio station has the feel of a real radio station.  Kids that come here to do shows get a fairly authentic feel and appreciation for what it is like to be a DJ; selecting music, doing intros, information, weather, etc.  By looking at the sign up board, it seems that radio can still be very popular with teenagers:

Camp radio station sign up board
Camp radio station sign up board, very few openings

Thus the camp owner has perhaps saved himself some grief with the FCC.  A potential interference and intermodulation situation has been avoided.  The new equipment covers the entire camp compound and better still, does not go too far beyond the front gate, which is exactly 121.4 feet away from the antenna mast.  Best yet, a whole bunch of teenagers are interested in doing radio shows and learning about music.  There are very few venues or paths for potential new talent to enter this business and things like this should be encouraged.

Update: A few sentences were changed for clarity.