The Gates Air FAX-10, Numero Dos

This is the second Gates Air FAX-10 that I have installed. This one is in the shipping container transmitter site from the previous post of the same name.  In this case, we dispensed with the equipment rack that came with the transmitter and installed it in a standard Middle Atlantic rack.   The Harris rack configuration wastes a lot of space and since space is at a premium, we decided to do it our own way.

Gates Air FAX-10 in Middle Atlantic rack
Gates Air FAX-10 in Middle Atlantic rack

The bottom of the rack has the transmission line dehydrator. The top of the rack has the Dielectric A60000 series 1 5/8 inch coax switch, a Tunwall TRC-1 switch controller and the Burk ARC-16 remote control.  I cut the rack panel top to accommodate the coax switch.  The racks were removed from an old studio site several years ago and were in storage since that time.

Gates Air FAX-10
Gates Air FAX-10

The Gates Air FAX-10 transmitter on the air, running a sports-talk format.

Dummy load and Broadcast Electronics FM10B transmitter
Dummy load and Broadcast Electronics FM10B transmitter

View from the other side showing the test load and BE FM10-B transmitter.  This transmitter had a problem that I have run into before with BE FM transmitters.  The jumper between the exciter and IPA had the wrong phase rotation causing reflected power.  I added a foot to it’s length and that problem disappeared.

North Adams Tower update II

Work continues on rebuilding the North Adams tower after the collapse of March 2014.  Over last winter, a new tower was erected.  This is a fairly substantial tower.

New North Adams tower on ground
New North Adams tower on ground
North Adams new tower erected
North Adams new tower erected

In the interim, a new Shively 6810 four bay half wave spaced antenna was ordered. This antenna will be combined for two stations, WUPE-FM and WNNI using a Shively 2630-2-06 branched combiner. The 70 foot utility pole next to the building will be retained as backup facility for both stations. The Shively Antenna went up in stages.

New WUPE-FM and WNNI Shively 6810 antenna
New WUPE-FM and WNNI Shively 6810 antenna
Tower climbers rigging tower for new antenna
Tower climbers rigging tower for new antenna

Prescott Tower from Rutland Vermont was on site to do the tower work. They were the primary contractor for installing the new tower and did a really nice job of it.

New North Adams tower ice bridges to various shelters
New North Adams tower ice bridges to various shelters
Hanging the top two bays of new antenna
Hanging the top two bays of new antenna
Lift of bottom two bays and first tuning section
Lift of bottom two bays and first tuning section
Securing bottom section and bolting bays together
Securing bottom section and bolting bays together

After that, there was twenty feet of rigid line, another tuning section, then the 1 5/8 inch helax into the transmitter room. The antenna was tuned and the load looks very good. We are waiting for the electrician to finish wiring up the new racks and we will move both stations into their new home.

Installation Check Lists

On the subject of project management; often times, we need to keep track of the small details that can derail a project, blow the budget and upset schedules. A quick check list can help to identify things that might not have been planned for. I developed a checklist mentality in the military. There, we had checklists for everything. Simple day to day things like disposing of garbage over the side, or pumping the CHT (sewage) tank to complex evolutions like entering or leaving port all had a checklist.  On the aforementioned CHT tank; the Coast Guard cutter I was on had a vacuum flush system to conserve water.  Emptying the CHT tank involved a complex set of valve openings and closings to rout compressed air into the vacuum tank and literally blow the sewage overboard.  Anyone can see the danger in such a design.  Failure to follow the exact procedure resulted in raw sewage blowing out of the nearest toilets, which were unfortunately (or perhaps humorously) in the lower level officer’s staterooms.

But I digress.

I have made a series of outlines for different project types.  These can be used as general guidelines for project planning and management.  Of course, each project is different, but these are flexible enough that they can be adapted on a project by project basis.

These are for general use, and should be adapted for your own purposes.  Don’t forget to document and label all the wire runs, etc.

Also, do not forget the transmitter site maintenance checklists: FM transmitter site maintenance list, AM transmitter site maintenance list. I have used these reliably at many different sites since I committed them to writing in late 1999.