IBOC=POS

The further we get into HD radio, Ibiquity‘s IBOC system, the weaker it looks.  Ibiquity has admitted that the digital signal lacks building penetration, calling indoor reception “impossible” and “non-existent” 10 miles from the transmitter site.   They have also stated the system has serious coverage problems during driving tests. Even with the proposed power increase from -20 dB to -14 dB, a 6 dB increase (squaring the power) showed some improvement, but still had significant signal problems.

Good thing all of those early adopters plunked down $25,000.00 in licensing fees to use it.  At least it provided “High Definition” radio, right?  Well, not exactly.  The HD in HD radio really doesn’t stand for anything, so says Ibiquity, it is just two letters they picked to name the system.  As far as the improved audio quality between the analog FM signal and the HD Radio signal goes, will the average listener care?  I doubt it very much.

Well then, what, exactly do stations get for implementing HD radio?  For a cut of the action, Ibiquity will allow stations to broadcast a second channel, which, isn’t that nice, especially since Ibiquity is paying all of those FCC spectrum use fees, right?  Wrong again, the station pays those fees every year and they can get quite hefty for class B radio stations in major markets.

Then there is the complete lack of public awareness, which, in light of the above problems, might be a good thing.  To date, only one car manufacturer, BMW, has installed stock HD radios in any car models.  If one where to go to a best buy and ask for a “digital radio,” they would likely show a radio with a digital readout on the tuner.  If one were to ask for a “HD Radio” they may or may not know what you are asking for.

Ibiquity’s answer to this is “Well, you guys are radio stations, right?  You should be able to market this system yourself.”  Okay, true enough.  If station WXYZ ran a HD radio awareness campaign, where would they send the bill?  That would be fair, after all, for using the station’s inventory to promote somebody else’s product.  Would Ibiquity take some money off the substantial licensing fee for this?  Somehow, I doubt it.

AM HD radio is is even more of a mess.  On AM HD Radio stations, analog signals are limited to 5 kHz, slightly better than telephone audio.  The digital signal washes out the first two adjacent channels on either side of the assigned carrier and can only be used during the day.  To me, last time I listened to it, it sounded strident and harsh, sort of like Sirius Satellite Radio, altogether another topic.

Then, there is the FCC mandating a proprietary codec for digital broadcasting.  I am not the only one who is being rubbed the wrong way by this, others have commented on it too.

If we are serrious about adopting a digital radio format in this country, all of the above issues need to be worked out.  It is time to sit down and take a long, hard, critical look at the IBOC system and evaluate it on its merits, not its marketing.  If indeed, an IBOC system is the best way to impliment digital radio, then the kinks need to be worked out now, else it will spell the end of part 73 broadcasting.

The FCC is studying the state of Journalism

The FCC has drafted a Notification of Inquiry (NOI) examining the state of media journalism in America. Why?  No harm can come from this, right?  Let us read a little further:

A major issue the report details is the possibility of “behavioral rules” for broadcasters, according to the official. Behavioral rules might include guidelines that broadcasts serve the public interest.

Bringing back Cold War-era guidelines mandating that broadcasters do “non-entertainment” programming is another idea being examined, according to the official.

From CNSNews.com

Doh! Now that most radio stations have fired their news departments, the government wants news.  Frankly, I think it is a dumb idea.  The hands of time can’t be turned back so there is no use trying.

There are radio stations out there that provide good local and national news, most NPR stations for example.  There are also a few commercial stations still doing it.  Those that can make money on it will and that is the way it should be.

I listen to the local NPR station’s (WAMC) program called “The Media Project.”  It is an interesting show where a Television news anchor, a local newspaper editor and the radio station president talk about media issues.  Often, it turns into a lament about how the internet news sources are cutting into their own audience because the internet is “free.”  The news paper editor in particular often feels that he is shouldering the burden (by paying the reporter’s salaries) of gathering the news and the free loading internet people who write blogs, like this one, merely leach off of the newspaper’s hard work.  And he has a point.

So charge for it.  I’d pay a $3-5 per month fee to have full on line access to a good local paper.  I think many other people would too.  When they started giving away their content is when they got into trouble and that is their own fault.  This would be a good formula:

  1. Media outlets (newspapers, TV stations, Radio stations, Cable companies, etc) get together come up with a policy for online content.
  2. A good example would be, limited free access to national stories and front page items and advertisements.  Charge a nominal subscription fee for locally generated content and full access.  Charge a higher fee for content without advertising (except classifieds).
  3. Create a website that is laid out like a newspaper.  Keep all the sections the same and make it very easy to navigate around in.

Some newspapers, like the New York Times, are already doing things like this.  The reality is that online media is here to stay.  Those legacy media outlets that want to survive are going to have to figure out a way to compete and make money online.