The FCC is studying the state of Journalism

The FCC has drafted a Notification of Inquiry (NOI) examining the state of media journalism in America. Why?  No harm can come from this, right?  Let us read a little further:

A major issue the report details is the possibility of “behavioral rules” for broadcasters, according to the official. Behavioral rules might include guidelines that broadcasts serve the public interest.

Bringing back Cold War-era guidelines mandating that broadcasters do “non-entertainment” programming is another idea being examined, according to the official.

From CNSNews.com

Doh! Now that most radio stations have fired their news departments, the government wants news.  Frankly, I think it is a dumb idea.  The hands of time can’t be turned back so there is no use trying.

There are radio stations out there that provide good local and national news, most NPR stations for example.  There are also a few commercial stations still doing it.  Those that can make money on it will and that is the way it should be.

I listen to the local NPR station’s (WAMC) program called “The Media Project.”  It is an interesting show where a Television news anchor, a local newspaper editor and the radio station president talk about media issues.  Often, it turns into a lament about how the internet news sources are cutting into their own audience because the internet is “free.”  The news paper editor in particular often feels that he is shouldering the burden (by paying the reporter’s salaries) of gathering the news and the free loading internet people who write blogs, like this one, merely leach off of the newspaper’s hard work.  And he has a point.

So charge for it.  I’d pay a $3-5 per month fee to have full on line access to a good local paper.  I think many other people would too.  When they started giving away their content is when they got into trouble and that is their own fault.  This would be a good formula:

  1. Media outlets (newspapers, TV stations, Radio stations, Cable companies, etc) get together come up with a policy for online content.
  2. A good example would be, limited free access to national stories and front page items and advertisements.  Charge a nominal subscription fee for locally generated content and full access.  Charge a higher fee for content without advertising (except classifieds).
  3. Create a website that is laid out like a newspaper.  Keep all the sections the same and make it very easy to navigate around in.

Some newspapers, like the New York Times, are already doing things like this.  The reality is that online media is here to stay.  Those legacy media outlets that want to survive are going to have to figure out a way to compete and make money online.

Donate a car to support radio

What are we, the National Kidney Founation?  I found this interesting link on the local NPR station website:  Donate a Car to support WAMC

For some reason, I like Car Talk.  Did I also mention I like getting my teeth drilled at the dentist and poking myself in the eye with sticks?  I am a radio engineer, after all, and pain is a lifestyle.

So, I’ve been keeping my eyes open (stick and all) for a possible donation candidate, and here it is:

car ready to be picked up for donation
car ready to be picked up for donation

A 19?? VW bug jammed between two trees.  This one is at our FM transmitter site in Peekskill, NY.  It has been there for several years, probably boosted from a nearby major metropolis and taken for a joy ride out to the country.  I checked the trunk (the one in the front) for bodies, and there are none.

So, when can you come and get it?  Oh, you will need a chain saw because the trees have grown a little bit since the car was parked here.

Tower down

You know it is going to be a bad day when:

a farmer mowing grass took a wrong turn on June 16, KFEQ AM lost a guy wire and eventually one of its four towers came toppling down

From Above Ground Level magazine.

Is hiring the farmer down the road to come and mow the AM field a smart thing to do?  It depends, I suppose, on whether or not your towers will be standing afterward.  Hopefully the guy had some insurance, if not then the station is basically screwed.  The article did not mention that, although it did state that “The station is wieghing it’s options,” Which does not sound good.

The good news is at least they were doing the maintenance.  Most AM stations these days don’t even bother to mow the fields.  Look at this picture:

Tall grass at an AM transmitter site.  Owner says don't cut it.
Tall grass at an AM transmitter site. Owner says don't cut it.

It is not that I don’t want the grass cut, I do.  However, I am not going to pay for it out of my own pocket, that is ridiculous.  So, it grows.

Why we like Nautel Transmitters

Because they work.  The old adage is, you get what you pay for.  There are many transmitter manufactures.  There are plenty of transmitters out there that are less expensive.  Those less expensive transmitters sound fine on the air, their AC/RF efficiencies are great, they look snazzy in the sales brochure.  I am sure the RF sales guy can spout out ten reasons why they are this or they are that.

And that is great.

Their parts count is intentionally kept low, so gone are the redundant power supplies, fans, RF amps and controller cards.  Gone are the extra heavy output capacitors, combiners, LC connectors on the RF stages.  Gone is the heavy grounding buss, the shielded covers on the controller, etc.

So, ask the slick RF sales guy if he is going to be available to answer the phone after the 2 am lightning strike.  Of course, he’ll lie… whisper sweet nothings in your ear…

To avoid all that, behold:  The Nautel V40 FM transmitter.  This is four V-10 transmitters into a magic T combiner.  The V-10 already has good redundancies.  Four of these things ganged together should be nearly bullet proof (and over the last three years, it has been).

WHUD Nautel V-40 Transmitters
WHUD Nautel V-40 Transmitters

This site has been fraught with power problems because it is at the end of a very long utility company feeder line. We also installed a LEA series surge suppressor.  We like the LEA unit, it has saved our bacon many times over.

Inside view of LEA surge supressor
Inside view of LEA surge suppressor

These transmitters normally run at about 7 KW each.  I can turn any one transmitter completely off and the others will automatically adjust their output powers keeping the station at full power.   That means daytime maintenance!  We like not having to drive to the transmitter site at night to vacuum.   It is really cool.

Therefore, to recap (in case you missed the major points of the story), we like the Nautel transmitter because:

  1. It does not go off the air
  2. If something breaks, I can turn off an individual transmitter and fix it
  3. I can clean them and do everything I need to during normal working hours
  4. They sound great on the air
  5. Nautel has excellent customer service
  6. They look cool

There you have it.