Happy New Year!

After a bit of reflection and a few good conversations over the New Year’s Holiday, I decided that I should continue my work on this blog.  I would like to thank all those that have stuck by and waited.  I have received numerous emails and messages off line, all of which have been read and appreciated.

Since the abrupt stoppage last July, which was absolutely necessary for me, many things have happened within the business.  Fortunately, during the hiatus, I was still taking pictures.  After sorting through them, here are a few interesting things that happened:

At one of our client’s AM transmitter sites in Albany, NY a 2.6 Million Watt solar system has been installed.

WROW-AM Steel mounting poles on antenna array field
WROW-AM Steel mounting poles on antenna array field

This project required many steel mounting posts be driven into the ground around the AM towers.  I don’t even know how many, but I would hazard a guess of over three hundred.  Each one of those mounting posts was hand dug down a depth of 6-10 inches to look for ground wires.  Where ever a ground wire was found, it was moved out of the way before the post was set.

WROW-AM ground wire moved out of way
WROW-AM ground wire moved out of way

Basically the solar array covers about 1/2 of the antenna array field.  All of the steel mounting hardware is tied into the ground system, making, what I am sure is a pretty large above ground counterpoise.

WROW-AM solar panel mounting hardware
WROW-AM solar panel mounting hardware

View from the south looking north:

Solar Array installed on WROW antenna array, Glenmont, NY
Solar Array installed on WROW antenna array, Glenmont, NY

View from the north, outside of the transmitter building, looking south:

Solar Array installed on WROW antenna array, Glenmont, NY

Power company interface and disconnect:

Solar Array utility company disconnect, Glenmont, NY
Solar Array utility company disconnect, Glenmont, NY

The utility company had to upgrade the transmission lines to the nearest substation to handle the additional power produced by the solar system. All in all, it was a fun project to watch happen.

At a certain studio building, which is over 150 years old, the roof needed to be replaced.  This required that the 3.2 meter satellite dish and non-penetrating roof mount be moved out of the way while that section of the roof was worked on.

3.2 meter satellite dish

Dish ready to move, all of the concrete ballast removed and taken down from roof.  The roofing contractors constructed a  caddy and the entire dish and mount was slid forward onto the area in front of it.  Since the front part of the roof was not reinforced to hold up the satellite dish, we did not reballast the mount and the XDS receivers ran off of the streaming audio for a couple of days until the dish was put back in its original position.

3.2 meter satellite dish ready to move
3.2 meter satellite dish ready to move

A couple of other studio projects have been underway in various places.  Pictures to follow…

One of our clients sold their radio stations to another one of our clients.

There has also been a bankruptcy of a major radio company here in the good ol’ US of A.  Something that was not unexpected, however, the ramifications of which are still being decided on in various board rooms.  One of the issues as contractors is whether or not we will get paid for our work.  All things considered, it could be much worse.

Learned a valuable lesson about mice chewed wires on generator battery chargers.  I noticed that the battery charger seemed to be dead, therefore, I reached down to make sure the AC plug was in all the way.  A loud pop and flash followed and this was the result:

Arc burns, right hand
Arc burns, right hand

My hand felt a bit warm for a while.  The fourth digit suffered some minor burns.  There is at least one guy I know that would be threatening a lawsuit right now.  Me, not so much…  All of the high voltage stuff we work on; power supplies that can go to 25 KV, and a simple 120 VAC plug is the thing that gets me.

The return of the rotary phase maker.

Rotary phase maker, Kay Industies T-10000-A

Mechanically derived 3rd phase used when the old tube type transmitter cannot be converted to single phase service.

Those are just a few of the things I have been working on.  I will generate some posts on current projects underway.  Those projects include a 2 KW FM transmitter installation, another studio project, repair work on a Harris Z16HD transmitter, etc

It is good to be back!

The GatesAir FLX-40 transmitter

The GatesAir FLX-40 transmitter is my first liquid cooled transmitter installation.  Previously, I have installed an air cooled Nautel NV-40, a V-40 and a couple of BE FM-35T/20T units.  The WEBE transmitter site in Bridgeport, Connecticut is an interesting facility.

Smoke Stack, Bridgeport Energy, Bridgeport, CT
Smoke Stack, Bridgeport Energy, Bridgeport, CT

This coal fired power plant smoke stack which currently holds up the six bay, half wave spaced Shively antenna.  The old BE FM35A transmitters are getting little bit long in the tooth.  Thus, we picked one to scrap, the other will be kept for backup service.

Scraping 34 year old BE FM30A transmitter

We saved a whole bunch of parts to keep the other FM35A on the air in backup service.

BE FM30A power supply cabinet

The power supply cabinet with that 500 pound plate transformer was the last to go.

On second thought, that plate supply transformer is a good spare to have
On second thought, that plate supply transformer is a good spare to have

The FLX-40 came on a large truck.  Fortunately, we were able to open the side gate at the power plant and get the truck to the front door of the transmitter building easily.  The transmitter consists of two large cabinets, each with two 10 kilowatt power blocks.  There is also a pump station and an outdoor heat exchanger.

FLX-40 cabinet two off the truck
FLX-40 cabinet two off the truck
FLX-40 cabinet one
FLX-40 cabinet one
FLX-40 in place, cabinets bolted together
FLX-40 in place, cabinets bolted together

This transmitter design is based on the Harris digital TV transmitters.

FLX-40 pump station
FLX-40 pump station

The pump station and heat exchanger are the same systems used for TV transmitters.  Liquid cooled units require a bit more planning on the installation end.  The coolant piping should have a high spot from which everything else slopes down hill.

Send and return coolant lines
Send and return coolant lines

I put a 1/4 to 12 inch pitch on everything.  Of course, there are several low points, the heat exchanger, pump station and bottom power blocks.

Holding steady at 18 PSI for 24 hours
Holding steady at 16 PSI for 24 hours

After assembling the cooling system, we pressure tested it for 24 hours.

Installation debris in the coolant line strainer
Installation debris in the coolant line strainer

Following that, we flushed the system with distilled water for several hours before we filled it with 40/60 glycol/water mix. Record low temperature in Bridgeport is -7 F (-22 C), thus a 40/60 mix will give protection down to -15 F (-26 C). The more water in the coolant, the better heat transfer capacity it has.

At the highest point in the system, there is a sight glass and an air purge valve
At the highest point in the system, there is a sight glass and an air purge valve

The pump station is controlled by the transmitter, which speeds up the pumps according to how much heat needs to be moved. In turn, the pump station control the fan speed on the heat exchanger outside.

FLX-40 pump station on line
FLX-40 pump station on line

The pump station runs with one motor most of the time. The other pump motor will run in the event of failure or if there is not enough flow through the power blocks. Each of the four power blocks has a flow rate meter on the return line.

Heat Exchanger Fan motor controllers, Variable Frequency Drive modules
Heat Exchanger Fan motor controllers, Variable Frequency Drive modules

Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) fan motor controllers show them running at half speed.

50 KW heat exhanger
50 KW heat exhanger

GatesAir 50 KW heat exchanger mounted on concrete pad behind the building. Air flows out from the motor side.

One of several shipping containers with modules and other parts for the FLX-40
One of several shipping containers with modules and other parts for the FLX-40

As with most things, some assembly required.  The RF modules needed to be placed in the power blocks according to their serial numbers on the test data sheet.  This insures that the information on the test data sheet matches the installed transmitter configuration.  The power combiner between the two cabinets as well as the reject load and directional coupler all need to be installed.

RF modules with large aluminium heat spreaders.   Coolant flows through each module.

FLX-40 power amp module
FLX-40 power amp module
WEBE, Bridgeport, CT GatesAir FLX-40 on the air for the first time
WEBE, Bridgeport, CT GatesAir FLX-40 on the air for the first time

On the air!

FLX-40 into the antenna
FLX-40 into the antenna

We ran the transmitter for several hours into the antenna yesterday afternoon. The coolant system is still purging air, so we periodically needed to add water/antifreeze to the pump station to keep the pressure between 12-18 PSI. Eventually, the TPO will be 34 KW with the HD carrier(s).

All in all, I would say that this was a fun project. The liquid cooled transmitter had a few extra steps during the installation process, but not too difficult.

Studio Buildout, Part III

I have been so busy that I forgot to post the pictures of the completed studio build out.  Overall, I would say that I am pretty pleased with the end result.  Of course, this is not Manhattan but rather an unrated market in central New York, and the budget reflected that.  Overall, the radio stations are in much better technical condition than before.  They are now located in the center of their community within walking distance of the town hall, other civic locations and activities.

There are five radio stations broadcasting from this new studio space.  Two stations are simulcast using the Westwood One Classic hits format from the satellite.  The only AM station is a Fox Sports Radio affiliate from the satellite with a local morning show.  Another one is a “we play anything” computer juke box and final station has a country format with quite a bit of local content.  Any station can go on the air from either studio.  In addition, all stations can simulcast the mother ship from Oneonta, which comes down via a Barix Exstreamer 1000.

Walton TOC

The Technical Operation Center consists of four racks containing the Ethernet routers, switches, a patch panel, automation systems, audio routing switchers, air monitor receivers, audio distribution amps, Barix units, Wheatstone Blade IP 88A STL, etc.  The equipment racks came from a disused site in New Jersey.

The satellite dish and receivers are located at the transmitter site, audio and closures come back via the Wheatstone Blade IP 88A.

Everything in this room is backed up by a STACO 2.5 KVA UPS.

TOC wire terminations

The wire termination from the studio are mounted to Krone LSA-PLUS blocks.  Studio trunk wiring consists of connectorized 25 pair CAT 5 cable.  There are also six runs of shielded CAT 5e cable for Ethernet and extended KVM from the TOC.

There is a manual transfer switch with a NEMA L14-30 input receptacle on the bottom.  A twenty for 10/4 SOJ cable will reach the ground from the window in the left hand side of the picture.  This is the standard NEMA plug/receptacle set for a moderate sized portable generator.  That feeds a 100 Amp sub panel which in turn feeds the racks and studio equipment.  Thus the entire facility can be run on a 5000 watt (good quality) portable generator in the event of a prolonged power outage.

The ground buss bar is connected to the main building ground at the service entrance.  All racks and studio consoles are grounded to this main ground point.

The air monitor receivers feed both studios.  There is also a provision to connect audio silence sensors up to each air monitor DA to notify the station staff in the event of an off air situation.  Believe it or not, this type of system has never been installed for these stations.

Studio A is the main studio.  The AudioArts Air4 console is a good fit for this type of operation.  These consoles have USB outputs, so the console can act as a sound card for the digital editing computer.  Each studio is equipped with an air monitor switch that can select any station to feed the external monitor input on the Air 4 console.  This allows the guy on duty to keep an eye on all the signals coming from the facility.

Studio A

The counter tops were custom made at a local kitchen place on trade. The microphone are Heil PR-22 with shock mounts, which are better than the Realistic mics in the old studio.  This is the first time that the main studio has had more than one microphone. The morning show guy has already pressed those guest mics into service with a few on air interviews.

The monitor speakers are JBL LSR305 mounted on home made speaker stands consisting of 18 inch black iron pipe and floor flanges.

Studio A

The small equipment rack is on casters and can roll out from under the studio furniture to get at the back of the equipment.  A used Gentner DH3 TELCO hybrid is used to get phone callers on the air.  Adobe Audition is used for editing and production on the left hand computer monitor.  That CPU is in the bottom of the roll around rack.

Studio A

The office chair and other furniture was also acquired on trade.

Studio A

What the operator sees. STORQ computer on the left for music, Scotts SS32 on the right for automation. Both are extended from the TOC. Unless the morning show guy is live on the air, the console is bypassed and the audio stays in the TOC.

It all works pretty well.

Studio B

Studio B is the same as Studio A except fewer microphones.

Studio B

Studio B operator view.  This studio can be used for one of the other stations or production.

Again, this is not a Fancy Nancy installation, but it does get the job done.