Studio Buildout, Part II

Some pictures of the studio build out in progress.

Counter top mounted
Counter top mounted

This is the counter top, mounted on a riser with the wire way cut into it. These counter tops will have AudioArts Air4 consoles installed on them.

AudioArts Air4 console with microphones
AudioArts Air4 console with microphones

Studio is taking shape. Console mounted with microphones. The rack mounted equipment goes in the Middle Atlantic rack under the counter top to the left of the console.  That rack is on casters so it rolls out to get access to the back of the equipment.  We have pretty much done away with cart pods or other counter top equipment housings.  The automation and other computers will be mounted in the rack room and extended to the studio with IP KVM extenders.

Sub Panel with manual transfer switch
Sub Panel with manual transfer switch

We installed a small Square D sub panel and manual transfer switch. This is to prevent the “Space Heater” outages, you know, when the morning show guy plugs a space heater into the same circuit as the console or computer, trips the breaker, then calls you because they are off the air. Yeah, good times.

In addition, the manual transfer switch will allow them to use a good portable generator if there is a prolonged power outage. On the bottom of the switch I installed a 30 amp twist lock input receptacle.

Since the building is older, the grounding buss was installed and wired directly to the ground at the service entrance panel.   The building sub panel for this floor is using conduit for the ground conductor back to the service entrance panel, which used to be code compliant but no longer.

5.8 GHz dish with non-penetrating roof mount
5.8 GHz dish with non-penetrating roof mount

STL/LAN extension dish installed on roof top. I used an old non-penetrating roof mount for a four foot satellite dish.  The building owner was very specific about not having anything puncture the new rubber membrane roof.  Thus, the heavy rubber mats and sand bags instead of cinder blocks.  These stations will be using a Cambium PTP-250 system for STL/TSL and LAN extension. This will haul program audio for five radio stations plus satellite backhaul and remote control. It is a relatively short path with the FM tower visible from the roof top.

5.8 GHz path to FM tower
5.8 GHz path to FM tower

It was kind of hazy when I took this picture, but if you look really close, you can see the FM tower out there on the hill top.  The path is 3.37 miles (5.43 KM).  With a 40 MHz channel width, that should net about 175 Mbps bi-directionally, which is more than enough to do what we want.  This set up will require a pair of managed switches and some VLAN configuration, which I will post separately.

No, this time we really mean it

The FCC is stepping up enforcement on pirate radio. They have released an enforcement advisory, which you can read here.

The advisory starts out like this:

WARNING: Unauthorized Radio Broadcasting is Illegal
Persons or Businesses Operating “Pirate” Broadcast Stations
Are in Violation of Federal Law and Subject to Enforcement Action

Okay, so when you stop laughing, here is what will really happen: They will go out, bust a few pirates, issue larger than normal Notices of Apparent Liability, collect none of the money from them and call it a huge success.  I doubt very much that the FCC or congress has the wherewithal to wage an all out effort against pirate broadcasting. This is the same FCC that eliminated most of its field enforcement agents and closed most of their field offices.  But that doesn’t matter either, because the NYC field office is still open and within a ten mile radius of that, there are likely a dozen or more unlicensed broadcasters.

In the mean time, if you are a licensed broadcaster, God forbid you accidentally miss a Required Monthly Test or have an unlocked tower fence.

It is like the city police force that sits on a stop sign writing tickets to otherwise law abiding motorists when the next block over, kids are out in the street openly selling bricks of heroin.  Meanwhile, the chief of police sits in his office furiously typing blistering memos saying that the sale of heroin is illegal.